Foot & Ankle Procedures

Foot and ankle problems can affect anyone, young or old, and they can significantly impact your function and quality of life. These complex parts of your body provide you with the ability to generate great force for high-impact activities like mixed martial arts or windsurfing. But your foot and ankle also give you the muscle system needed to ballroom dance, making them an amazing balance of power and finesse.

The physicians at Resurgens Orthopaedics are experts in the complexities of foot and ankle anatomy as well as microvascular surgery. This allows us to diagnose and treat the small bones, tendons, vessels, and delicate nerves that could be the cause of your foot and ankle discomfort.

Depending on your diagnosis, the prescribed treatment may include surgical or non-surgical options. Follow the links below to view additional information and educational videos describing the various procedures performed by Resurgens Orthopaedics' foot and ankle doctors.

Common Types of Foot Procedures

There are many types of injuries and conditions that can affect the foot. Likewise, there are many treatment options available for each unique foot injury or ailment.

Some of the foot procedures we offer at Resurgens Orthopaedics' include:

Absorbable Antibiotic Bead Treatment for Osteomyelitis

Absorbable Antibiotic Bead Treatment for Osteomyelitis is used to help treat bone infections. A surgeon places medicated beads into the infected bone in order to provide more direct treatment and increase the efficacy of antibiotics.

Calcaneal Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation)

Calcaneal Fracture Fixation involves a surgeon realigning the fractured calcaneus. The surgeon inserts insert guide wires, plates, and screws into the calcaneus to correct the fracture.

Calcaneal Sliding Osteotomy (with Lateral Plate Fixation)

Calcaneal Sliding Osteotomy (with Lateral Plate Fixation) is a procedure where a surgeon divides the calcaneus (the heel bone.) The rear part of this divided bone is shifted to either create or diminish the foot arch. The two halves of the bone are secured with plates and screws so the bone will heal in the correct position.

Calcaneal Tongue-Type Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation)

Calcaneal Tongue-Type Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) is a procedure where a surgeon realigns bones and stabilizes a fractured calcaneus (heel bone) with screws and plates. Some patients may require a walking brace after surgery.

Charcot Foot Treatment Options

Your doctor can manage early symptoms of Charcot Foot with a cast or a boot. You will need to stay off the fractured foot until it can heal. You may need a series of casts to promote healing.

In serious cases, Charcot Foot may require some surgery. This can include removing bone, or using plates and screws to hold the bone in place. The condition can also be treated with an ankle fusion bracelet.

Another treatment option is called external fixation. With this technique, a frame made of metal rings holds your bones in the correct position so they can heal. It may be combined with other surgical treatments as necessary.

Cotton Osteotomy (Medial Cuneiform Opening Wedge Osteotomy)

Cotton Osteotomy (Medial Cuneiform Opening Wedge Osteotomy) is a procedure where a surgeon creates an incision to access one of the bones of your midfoot known as the medial cuneiform. A surgeon divides the bone and inserts a wedge - made of bone graft, metallic graft, or specialized metallic plate - the wedge is held in place with staples, plates, or screws. This helps create an arch in your foot.

Excision of Morton's Neuromas

There are two common ways to perform Excision of Morton's Neuromas. One involves a surgeon releasings the pinched nerve by cutting the ligament. This first method creates no loss of feeling in the toe.

The other option is to remove the entire neuroma. The nerve and/or the ligament is cut and removed. The third and fourth toes may experience permanent numbness.

Excision of Soft Tissue Masses

Excision of Soft Tissue Masses is an outpatient procedure where a physician removes a mass that has formed beneath the skin of the foot.

This procedure is often used to remove a ganglion cyst - a fluid filled sac that is connected to a joint capsule or tendon sheath. A physician creates an incision, removes the cyst, and fixes the bone. Recovery depends on where the cyst is located.

Fixation for LisFranc Injury

Fixation for LisFranc injury: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an exploratory incision in the top of the foot. Since there are a variety of ways to fix the injury, the surgeon determines the best treatment plan. For example the bones can be realigned and stabilized with the help of plates, screws, wires, and/or specialized implants. Or they may choose to modify your bones to fuse together.

Gastrocnemius Recession (Endoscopic Approach)

Gastrocnemius Recession (Endoscopic Approach): During this outpatient procedure, a surgeon guides a thin tube called a cannula through the back of the leg. They insert an endoscope into the tube and use a special tool to cut the foot muscles. This allows the foot to release into a more natural position.

Gastrocnemius Recession (Intramuscular Approach)

Gastrocnemius Recession (Intramuscular Approach) is an outpatient procedure where a surgeon makes a small incision on the inner side of the leg over the calf muscle. Next, the surgeon inserts a retractor between the fascia and soleus muscles. Then the surgeon uses a specialized device to access and cut fascia of the gastrocnemius. This releases tension and allows the foot to affect a more natural position. In some cases, they may also release the fascia of the soleus muscle.

Jones Fracture Fixation (Intramedullary Screw)

Jones Fracture Fixation (Intramedullary Screw): During this procedure, a surgeon aligns fractured pieces of the metatarsal. Then they create a channel through the center of this bone. Finally an intramedullary screw is inserted through the end of the channel to stabilize the two bones.

Jones Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation)

Open Reduction and Internal Fixation is a procedure where a surgeon accesses the fractured metatarsal. Then they insert one or more surgical screws to stabilize the bone. In some cases wires, or a surgical plate, may be used in addition to the screws.

Kidner Procedure

Kidner Procedure: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an exploratory incision to assess the foot. If the posterior tibial tendon is attached to the accessory navicular, they detach the two. Then the surgeon separates the accessory navicular from the navicular. However, in some cases, tissue connecting the bone may need to be separated and cut.

Lapidus Arthrodesis (with Medial Plate Fixation)

Lapidus Arthrodesis (with Medial Plate Fixation) is a procedure where a surgeon separates the metatarsal bones from the medial cuneiform. Then they remove cartilage from their ends. Next they stabilize the bones with a metal plate and screws to hold them in a corrective position. Over time, these bones should heal together as a fusion.

Lateral Column Lengthening (Evans Osteotomy) for Adult Acquired Flatfoot

Lateral Column Lengthening: During this procedure, a surgeon divides the heel bone just behind the joint where it meets the cuboid bone. A bone graft wedge is inserted in the division between the bones. Then the surgeon locks the bones in place with a plate and screws. This wedge lengthens the outer side of the foot and creates an arch on the inner side. Over time, the bone and graft will fuse together.

LisFranc Ligament Repair (Suture Button Technique)

LisFranc Ligament Repair (Suture Button Technique) involves a surgeon creating two incisions on your foot to expose the injured joint. Then a clamp is placed on your bones to realign them. Next, a surgeon drills a tunnel through medial cuneiform and the second metatarsal. They then pass one end of a special fixation device through this tunnel. The device anchors the bones together. Sometimes the surgeon includes one anchor to secure the medial cuneiform to the middle cuneiform.

Medial Calcaneal Sliding Osteotomy

Medial Calcaneal Sliding Osteotomy is a procedure where a surgeon uses a cutting device to divide the calcaneus (the heel bone) into two halves. The loose end of the bone is shifted to modify the shape of the foot, creating an arch. Surgical screws are used to reunite the pieces of bone.

Metatarsal Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation)

Metatarsal Fracture Fixation is a procedure where a surgeon creates one or more incisions to access the metatarsal joint. Then they realign the bone. Finally they stabilize it with screws, wires, or plates.

Midfoot Fusion

Midfoot Fusion is a procedure where a surgeon makes an exploratory incision on the top of the foot. If there is significant damage to the tissue between the bones, the remaining cartilage is removed. And if the foot is misaligned, the bones are repositioned. Screws and/or plates are inserted through the bones to hold them in place.

Plantar Fascia Release (Open Technique)

Plantar Fascia Release (Open Technique) is a procedure where a surgeon creates one or more incisions in the plantar fascia - a thick band of connective tissue that supports the foot - to release tension on the irritated tissue in the foot. In some cases the surgeon may need to attach or detach the plantar fascia from the heel, or remove bony growths.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis: This procedure begins with a sample of your blood. The sample is spun in a centrifuge which separates the blood into plasma, platelets, and white and red blood cells. A doctor injects this mixture in the damaged tissue of your foot. Injecting this mixture causes your immune system to react and purge damaged cells. This prepares the body for healing. As stem cells multiply, damaged tissues are repaired and rebuilt over time.

Popliteal Fossa Block

Popliteal Fossa Block: During this outpatient procedure, a physician locates the tibial nerve and guides a needle down the back of the knee to the nerve. Then anesthetic is slowly injected through the nerve.

Pulse Dye Laser Wart Removal

Pulse Dye Laser Wart Removal is a minimally-invasive procedure where a doctor prepares the affected area by scraping or shaving the wart's thick skin. Then the doctor directs a laser onto the wart. The pulses of laser light heat the area's red blood cells, cutting off the area's red blood supply and subsequently killing the virus that caused the wart. It is relatively painless.

Radiofrequency Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis (TOPAZ® Coblation®)

Radiofrequency Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis (TOPAZ® Coblation®) is a procedure where a surgeon inserts a special device through the skin to a band of tissue at the bottom of the foot, known as the plantar fascia. When activated, the device emits radiofrequency waves that dissolve thick scar tissue within the fascia. By dissolving the tissue, the surgeon creates a new injury, but now the new injury will be able to heal under more ideal circumstances. Overtime new healthy tissue will develop in the plantar fascia, reducing pain, and restoring function in the foot.

Resection of Haglund's Deformity

Resection of Haglund's Deformity: During this procedure, a surgeon either makes an incision in your skin, or views the deformity with an arthroscope. Next, they remove the Haglund's Deformity bump from your heel bone. Additional steps may be required If your Achilles tendon has been damaged.

Subtalar Fusion

Subtalar Fusion is a procedure where the surgeon makes an incision on the outside of the foot and examines the joint between the calcaneus (the heel bone) and talus (ankle) - all remaining cartilage between the bones of the subtalar joint is removed. Then if the heel bone is misaligned, it's position is corrected. Finally one or more screws are inserted into the bones to stabilize them. Over time these bones will fuse into one.

Subtalar Implant for Adult Acquired Flatfoot

Subtalar Implant for Adult Acquired Flatfoot: During this procedure, your surgeon makes an incision on the outer side of the ankle. This allows access to an opening between the talus and the calcaneus known as the sinus tarsi. Then they place a guide wire into the sinus tarsi and put in a permanent implant. The implant corrects the alignment and allows for proper alignment and gait.

Common Types of Toe Procedures

Toes are prone to a wide variety of conditions and injuries. Similarly, many treatment options exist for each type of ailment or foot injury.

Resurgens Orthopaedics' offers many types of treatments for your toes. Some of our common procedures include:

Arthrosurface® HemiCAP® Resurfacing for the Great Toe

Arthrosurface® HemiCAP® Resurfacing for the Great Toe: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an incision and the joint is exposed and assessed. A guide wire in inserted in the damaged area. Next the surgeon screws the base of the implant into the guidewire. The screw is the anchor that will hold the implant in place. And a metal cap is inserted on top of that. Bony outgrowths are removed.

Bunion Correction with Scarf and Akin Osteotomy

Bunion Correction with Scarf and Akin Osteotomy is a procedure where the surgeon makes an incision between the first and second toe. Then they carefully release the tight ligaments that are holding the toe out of alignment. This exposes the first metatarsal and proximal phalanx. Using a saw they remove the bump of bone that forms the bunion. The surgeon then makes a series of cuts in the metatarsal, dividing the bone into two pieces. They manipulate the angle of these pieces so the bone is positioned closer to the second toe. Screws are placed to anchor the bone.

Bunionectomy (Chevron Bunionectomy)

Chevron Bunionectomy is an outpatient procedure. A surgeon creates in incision to expose the bunion. Then they remove a portion of bone to eliminate the bump. In most cases elimination isn't enough to correct the deformity. So to correct the alignment the surgeon cuts below the head of the metatarsal. The surgeon may need to release tendons before realigning the bones.

Bunionectomy with Wedge Osteotomy

Bunionectomy with Wedge Osteotomy: During this procedure, the surgeon exposes the bunion and trims away the bony bump. If a tendon is pulling a toe out of alignment, the surgeon may release it. These modifications may be enough to correct the deformity. However, If it is not enough, the bones of the toe require realignment. The surgeon will remove portions of bone and shift the head of the first metatarsal to improve the alignment.

Bunionette Deformity Correction (Overview)

Bunionette Deformity Correction is a procedure where a surgeon may be able to treat your bunionette by removing the bony bump. This will give your foot a more natural shape which will make it easier to wear shoes more comfortably. However, this is not enough to correct all bunionettes. If your deformity is severe, the surgeon may need to modify the metatarsal so that your toe can be shifted in to a normal position. After the section is realigned they can be stabilized with wires, screws, or with a metal plate.

Bunionette Deformity Correction (Distal Fifth Metatarsal Osteotomy)

Bunionette Deformity Correction (Distal Fifth Metatarsal Osteotomy) involves the surgeon creating a small incision along the outside of the metatarsophalangeal joint for access. This joint is where the phalanx of the toe meets the metatarsal. The bunionette is located on the metatarsal. The surgeon uses a cutting instrument to remove extra bone growth from the metatarsal. The head of the metatarsal is shifted inwards, reducing the width of the foot and providing a more stable place for the fifth toe. Then they insert a screw into the head of the metatarsal, locking it in place.

Bunionette Deformity Correction (Fifth Metatarsal Partial Head Resection)

Bunionette Deformity Correction (Fifth Metatarsal Partial Head Resection): During this procedure the surgeon creates a small incision along the outer side of the foot to access the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, where the phalanx of the joint meets the head of the metatarsal. The bunionette is located on the head of the fifth metatarsal. Once it is exposed the surgeon uses a cutting instrument to carefully remove the bony protrusion. Then they smooth and reshape the bone.

Cheilectomy

A Cheilectomy is a procedure where the surgeon makes an incision over the base of the big toe to examine the joint. Any bony growths are carefully removed.

DuVries Arthroplasty

DuVries Arthroplasty: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an incision on top of the toe to access the tendons and bones. They focus on the joint between the middle phalanx and the distal phalanx. The surgeon carefully cuts the ligaments and soft tissues that surround this joint allowing the bones to be separated. The surgeon removes the end of the middle phalanx removing the bone and creating space to allow the toe to straighten. A metal pin is inserted to lock the bones together. Over time these will fuse together or fill in with scar tissue.

First Metatarsal-phalangeal Joint (MTP) Arthrodesis

First Metatarsal-phalangeal Joint (MTP) Arthrodesis is a procedure where the surgeon examines the Metatarsal-phalangeal joint (MTP), and cartilage between the joints is removed. If the joint is misaligned, then the bones are repositioned. A metal screw, pins, or plates are inserted through the bone for fusion, and to angle the toe slightly upwards for walking. A second metal plate may be used to stabilize the toe.

First MTP Joint Fusion (Locking Plate)

First MTP Joint Fusion (Locking Plate): During this procedure, the surgeon exposes the Metatarsal-phalangeal joint (MTP). Then they carefully clear away the bony growths from the ends of the two bones that meet at this joint. These are the proximal phalanx and the first metatarsal. The surgeon removes the cartilage from the ends of these bones and reshapes these bones to fit together. Then they secure the bones with a metal plate and screws. Another screw is placed through the bone to provide extra stability. Over time the two bones will fuse.

Hammertoe Correction (PIP Joint Arthroplasty)

PIP Joint Arthroplasty involves the surgeon creating a small incision on the top of the toe to access the phalanges and the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. They carefully remove the proximal phalanx at the PIP joint. Shortening this bone relieves pressure and creates more space, so these bones can be aligned properly. They carefully straighten the toe, moving it into a relaxed and natural position. Then they insert a pin into the toe to hold the joint in place.

Lapidus Procedure for Bunion Correction

Lapidus Procedure for Bunion Correction: During this procedure, the surgeon trims away the excess bone from the metatarsal. They may also cut a tendon if it is pulling the toe out of alignment. They then focus on the joint and reposition the metatarsal. They may need to remove a section of bone to create space for for the metatarsal to be repositioned correction. Shifting the base of the metatarsal allows the entire toe to be straightened into proper alignment. Screws, pins, or other implant devices are used to anchor the bones.

Partial Nail Removal (Matrixectomy)

Partial Nail Removal (Matrixectomy) involves the surgeon placing a constricting band around the toe to limit blood flow. The surgeon gently lifts the ingrown portion of the toe out from under the skin. This portion is cut from the nail. They treat the nail so the nail cannot regrow, resulting in a smaller toenail.

SMART Toe™ Intramedullary Memory Implant

SMART Toe™ Intramedullary Memory Implant: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an incision in the problematic toe. They seperate bones at the target joint and drill channels through into the center of the two phalanges that will be fused. This channel provides space for the implant to be inserted. The implant is made of a memory metal that reacts to heat and cold. Prior to implementation it is frozen to keep it contracted in a long narrow shape. During this state the surgeon slips the implant into the hollow ends of the bone. Within about a minute body heat warms the implant, locking it in place and anchoring the bones.

Tendon Transfer for Hammertoe (FDL tendon transfer)

Tendon Transfer for Hammertoe (FDL tendon transfer) is a procedure where ehe surgeon accesses and releases the FDL tendons. They reach beneath the toe and detach the FDL tendon. This alleviates the pulling force that has created the hammer toe. Then the tendon is divided into two strands; the strands are pulled up on either side of the bones and brought together on top of the bone. The surgeon uses sutures to reconnect the tendon and anchor it in place.

Weil Osteotomy for Claw Toe

Weil Osteotomy for Claw Toe: During this procedure, a surgeon cuts the end of the metatarsal at an angle. This allows the bone to be slid back. They insert a screw to the top of the bone to secure the bone. Excess bone is removed. This shortens the metatarsal and creates more room for the toe bones.

Winograd Procedure for Ingrown Toenail

Winograd Procedure for Ingrown Toenail: During this procedure, a band that constricts blood flow is placed around the toe. An incision is created that splits the ingrown toenail through the rest of the nail and continues down through the tissue to the surface of the bone. They then create a second incision down through the overlapping tissue on the outer edge of the nail. This wedge is removed from the toe. This results in a slightly thinner toenail and permanently eliminates the ingrown edge of the nail.

Common Types of Ankle Procedures

Ankles can experience all types of different injuries and conditions. Each ankle injury condition requires a unique treatment regiment, based on the severity of the injury or condition.

Your ankles are essential for walking and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Some of the common treatment options we offer at Resurgens Orthopaedics include:

Achilles Tendon Lengthening

Achilles Tendon Lengthening: During this procedure, the surgeon makes several small incisions through the Achilles tendon. This allows the tendon to stretch, but not tear. Over time, the tendon becomes longer as it stretches.

Ankle Fracture Surgery

Ankle Fracture Surgery is a procedure where a surgeon makes one or more exploratory incisions on one or more sides of your ankle. Then they carefully inspect your ankle. If small loose pieces of bone are found, they are taken out. After that a surgeon may use one or more implants like screws, plates, or rods to stabilize the joint.

Ankle Fusion, Transfibular

Transfibular Ankle Fusion is a surgical procedure where a surgeon creates an incision along the outside of the ankle to expose the joint. They remove the fibula - the long bone that rests against the tibia. Next, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from the end of the tibia and the talus. Then the surgeon adjusts these bones and adjusts their position so they're aligned properly. They may need to use bone grafts to help alignment.

After alignment is complete the surgeon stabilizes the ankle with screws, plates, or a combination of the two. This hardware joins the tibia and the talus. In some cases the surgeon may need to remove the bony bump that protrudes from the inner side of the ankle. If so, a second incision will be needed.

Ankle Replacement

Ankle Replacement: During this procedure, a surgeon creates an exploratory incision on the front of the ankle to examine the joint. Then the surgeon removes a portion of the tibia and the talus. They may also remove a portion of the fibula. After the joint is prepared the surgeon inserts a special implant to restore mobility.

Arthroscopic Articular Cartilage Repair (Ankle)

Arthroscopic Articular Cartilage Repairis a procedure where a surgeon injects fluid into the ankle to expand the ankle and provide a clear view of the joint. Then the surgeon makes incisions in the ankle to have a clear view of the joint. An arthroscopic camera and tools are used to inspect and clear away damage.

Arthroscopy of the Ankle

Arthroscopy of the Ankle: During this procedure, a surgeon pumps fluid into your ankle. The fluid expands the joint and makes it easier for your surgeon to see. Then they create two small openings in your skin. They insert an arthroscope in one opening and other instruments are put in a second opening. Your ankle is inspected for damage. The surgeon may decide to correct your ankle then or treat it during a later procedure.

Debridement of the Achilles Tendon

Debridement of the Achilles Tendon: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an incision in the Achilles tendon. They examine the tendon and sheath that contains it. If there is damaged tissue or calcium deposits, it is removed. Healthy portions may be reinforced.

Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction

Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction is a procedure where an incision is made in the outer side of the ankle. Then a surgeon examines your ligaments and looks for problems like tears or stretches. Stretched ligaments may be shortened, and damaged ligaments may be repaired.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Achilles Tendonitis

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Achilles Tendonitis is a procedure where a doctor injects a PRP mixture into your Achilles tendon. The PRP mixture is a special blend created from a blood sample (provided by you), which has been separated with centrifugal force. The PRP injection creates a reaction in your immune system that helps repair damaged cells in the Achilles. PRP preps the body for healing, and damaged tissue is repaired as stem cells are generated and multiply.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Peroneal Tendonitis

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Treatment for Peroneal Tendonitis begins by spinning a sample of your blood in a centrifuge. This separates the sample into platelets, plasma, and red and white blood cells. The platelets are then concentrated and mixed with some of the plasma, which a doctor then injects into your damaged tissues. PRP causes your immune system to react and take away damaged cells, prepping the body for healing. Over time, stem cells multiply, repair, and rebuild damaged tissues.

Radiofrequency Treatment for Achilles Tendinosis (TOPAZ® Coblation®)

Radiofrequency Treatment for Achilles Tendinosis (TOPAZ® Coblation®): During this procedure, a surgeon inserts a special TOPAZ tool through the Achilles. When the TOPAZ is activated, it dissolves scar tissue with radio waves. This allows the injury to heal under controlled circumstances. New healthy tissue will develop in the Achilles tendon improving mobility and reducing pain.

Surgery for Achilles Tendon Rupture

Surgery for Achilles Tendon Rupture: During this procedure, an incision is made in the back of the ankle. Special tools are used to gently pull healthy tendons together. Finally, the ends are stitched together.

Talar Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation)

Talar Fracture Fixation (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) is a procedure where the surgeon creates one or more incisions on the front of the foot to access the talus. Next they realign the fracture and insert guide wires into the bone. Then they stabilize the fracture with screws.

Tarsal Tunnel Decompression

Tarsal Tunnel Decompression is a procedure where a small incision is made on the inner side of your ankle to expose the flexor retinaculum. A surgeon cuts this tissue along the path of the nerve. This allows the tissue to stretch, and creates a more open space inside the tarsal tunnel. This relieves pressure on the tibial nerve. Before closing, the surgeon examines nearby structures to make sure nothing else is pressing against the nerve.

Tendon Transfer (FHL to Achilles)

Tendon Transfer (FHL to Achilles): During this procedure, a surgeon creates an incision in the skin to expose the Achilles tendon and the calcaneus (the heel bone). If a bony bump has formed on the heel bone, it is removed. The surgeon also removes any diseased tissue from your achilles. Next, the surgeon cuts the hallucis longus tendon, (commonly called the "FHL" tendon) to disconnect it from the big toe. Then they drill a hole through the heel bone. The FHL is put into this drilled hole and locked into the heel bone.

Tibiotalocalcaneal Fusion (with Intramedullary Rod)

Tibiotalocalcaneal Fusion (with Intramedullary Rod): During this procedure, the surgeon reshapes the tibius, talus, and calcaneus, removing cartilage from the ends of these bones. A guide wire is inserted and a rod is placed inside the tibius, talus, and calcaneus,

TightRope™ Fixation for Ankle Syndesmosis

TightRope™ Fixation for Ankle Syndesmosis: During this procedure, the surgeon makes an incision on the outer side of the ankle to access the joint. If bony fragments have broken loose from the fibula, they are either removed or stabilized, Then the pieces are realigned and the surgeon repairs the fibula with a fixation plate. Next, with the aid of a guidewire, the surgeon drills a tunnel through one of the lower holes of the fixation plate through the fibula and all the way through the tibia. Finally, they put in the oblong button to anchor the bones and the tendon together.

Total Ankle Joint Replacement (Salto® Talaris)

A Total Ankle Joint Replacement (Salto® Talaris) is a procedure where a portion of the tibia is removed. Then the top of the talus is cut away and smoothed. Sometimes a portion of the fibula is removed, too. Then a special device is implanted to help manage pain and restore mobility to the ankle. A hospital stay of 1-3 days after surgery may be required, in addition to physical therapy, ankle support, and regular check-ins.

Total Ankle Joint Replacement (STAR Mobile-Bearing)

A Total Ankle Joint Replacement (STAR Mobile-Bearing) is a procedure where a surgeon reshapes the end tibia and the top talus to provide a stable surface for the implant. Special cutting guides help ensure the exact fit. The surgeon inserts the implant in the joint and ensures it fits.

Total Ankle Joint Replacement (Wright INBONE® II)

A Total Ankle Joint Replacement (Wright INBONE® II) is a procedure that offers the ability to bypass segments of poorer quality bones - including bone cysts - and provide stable fixation. A device is implanted deeply into the tibia and connects to the talus.

Triple Arthrodesis

Triple Arthrodesis: During this procedure, two incisions are made by your surgeon. The first is on the outside of the ankle, and the second is on the inside of the ankle. The surgeon examines the joints, and all remaining cartilage between the bones of these joints is removed. If the hindfoot is misaligned, it's position is corrected. Screws, staples, or plate are inserted to stabilize the bones of the joint. Over time these bones will fuse together.

ZipTight™ Fixation for Ankle Syndesmosis

ZipTight™ Fixation for Ankle Syndesmosis is a procedure where the surgeon makes an incision to the outer side of the ankle to assess the joint. If bony fragments are loose, they are either removed or stabilized. If the fibula has separated, the pieces are realigned. The surgeon typically repairs the fibula by attaching a fixation plate with surgical screws. After the fibula has been stabilized its relationship to the tibula can be restored and reinforced with a ZipTight system. The ZipTite system anchors and stabilizes the joint.

General Procedures

Below we have included some additional explanations for other procedures that may be a part of your treatment plan. If you want to learn more about these terms, please schedule an appointment to learn more about the treatment options available at Resurgens today!

Amniotic and Placental Graft Tissue for Surgery and Wound Care

Amniotic and Placental Graft Tissue for Surgery and Wound Care: These grafts are made from recovered fetal tissue, which is harvested after birth. Components include the placenta, umbilical cord, or tissues of the amniotic membrane. When this graft is introduced into your body or onto your skin, it surrounds and protects your damaged tissues. It can provide a scaffold for your body as it repairs cells. This procedure is associated with reduced inflammation and scarring as well as adhesion prevention.

Anesthesia Overview

Anesthesia Overview: There are many types of anesthetics used to block to the pain of a medical procedure. Local anesthesia is used for minor procedures such as sutures or skin biopsies. Local anesthesia is used to numb a small area of tissue without affecting surrounding areas. Regional anesthesia is used for more extensive procedures that involve larger areas of the body such as the knee or hand. They can block sensation in an entire limb. Conscious sedation is a form of anesthesia that relaxes the patient and dulls painful sensations. It is used during procedures like endoscopy and plastic surgery. General anesthesia results in a complete loss of consciousness. It is commonly used for major surgery.

General Anesthesia

General Anesthesia: There are two main types of general anesthesia. Intravenous anesthesia is given through a needle, and gas anesthesia is supplied through a mask or a tube. The type that is used will depend on the procedure. An anesthesia provider also examines a patient's medical history and past use of anesthesia to decide which type is best for the patient.

Local Anesthesia

Local Anesthesia: Before administering local anesthesia, a health care professional considers the patient's health, medications, allergies, and past use of anesthesia in order to decide which solution is best for the patient. Local anesthesia can be injected with a needle or administered with a cream or gel. The type used depends on the part of the body it is used on.

Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC)

Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC): Anesthesia may sometimes be given to the patient through a needle or an IV. The amount depends on the medical procedure. Some patients feel relaxed and groggy but are awake during the entire procedure and can respond to questions and commands. Others may fall into a light sleep. The anesthesia provider monitors the patient's vital signs and adjusts the anesthesia to keep the patient safe and comfortable. The patient will not remember pain from the procedure.

Multimodal Anesthesia and Pain Control

Multimodal Anesthesia and Pain Control: With this approach, patients are given focused anesthesia and a combination of pain medicines. The types and doses and these medicines may differ according to your needs. Your multimodal plan may begin before your procedure. This approach speeds your discharge from the hospital, eases your transition to physical therapy, and can even shorten the overall length of your recovery.

Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia

Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia is injected with a needle. The site of the injection depends on the part of the body being treated. The needle is placed near a cluster of nerves that serve as a pathway for pain signals. The medicine blocks sensation along these nerves. Effects of Peripheral Nerve Block can last several hours after the procedure.

Regional Anesthesia

Regional Anesthesia can be injected in the area around one or more nerves in the arms or legs to numb all or parts of these extremities. In some cases, a catheter is inserted to numb a limb, torso, or groin area for a long period of time. It is commonly used with general anesthesia.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Overview

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Overview: PRP injections use a blood sample to provide a treatment plan. After harvesting a blood sample, a physician places it in a centrifuge. As the centrifuge spins it creates a heterogeneous solution of red and white blood cells, plasma, and platelets. This mixture is injected into damaged tissues. The injected mixture provokes a reaction from the immune system, which causes it to purge damaged cells. Stem cells begin to multiply, causing damaged tissues to be gradually rebuilt over time.

Tendon Repair (Augmentation with Collagen Graft)

Tendon Repair (Augmentation with Collagen Graft): The tendon is prepared and damaged parts of the tendon are trimmed away. The tendon may be strengthened with sutures or other techniques. Once this is complete, the surgeon adds the graft tissue. The tissue can be wrapped around the tendon or layered on one side of the tendon. The graft material is sutured into place, and it will be absorbed by the tendon as it heals.

Not all foot and ankle conditions require surgical procedures

While many types of foot and ankle conditions require surgical solutions, other treatment options are available for less severe issues. These non-surgical treatment options may include custom orthotics, bracing or casting, physical therapy, injections, and other outpatient treatment methods. If you've been experiencing foot or ankle problems, schedule an appointment with a Resurgens hand and wrist physician today!